Rounded version of dust collector

Print: Vacuum Dust Collector for Wall Drilling

Disclosures: This is one of our designs; the STL is available on Thingiverse. There’s also Amazon Affiliate and direct links to the Rigid “toolbox style” vacuum mentioned because it has quickly taken over our “Oh we always need a vacuum right here” needs: we have one under our main work desk and one under the pallet rack where our 3D printers and one of our CNC machines live.

We had to do a bunch of drilling into the wall in an area that was already populated with furniture. The solution? Spend hours designing and tweaking a 3D-printed dust collector. The design went through two major iterations: an angle-y one, and a roundier one.

Design Process

We do most of our print designs in Fusion 360. For the most part, a great app (but often crashes on coils) and for relatively simple stuff like this, perfectly adequate. The plethora of online resources for learning and using make it hard to beat for the pro-am maker.

More angled vacuum dust collection attachment
First, angled version

The original design (more angled version) worked great, but wouldn’t stick to the wall by itself. Why was the air path not an oval? Not sure–that’s just how it started out. Why was sticking to the wall by itself valuable? When working solo it’s actually convenient when drilling into wall studs; when just plowing through drywall you don’t need two hands on the drill anyway.

Rounded version of dust collector
More-rounded version; sticks to the wall!

We corrected most of the airflow problems by un-boxing the air path to the collection inlet and de-complicating some of the geometry where the main dust collection hole is.

One issue we ran in to (and why there’s such an aggressive taper) is that keeping the drill from bumping into the DC attachment we had to rotate one or the other or both. While it definitely has an impact on airflow, it also means we don’t have to get all wrist-twisty to complete even deep holes.

What’s Next?

We’ll put up some designs for other hose diameters (notably a 1 7/8″ one for our new Rigid “toolbox style” vacuum, which we’re loving!) and we’re likely going to further widen and smooth out the main airflow path into the hose so it’ll be even suckier.

We’ll also be doing quick reviews of both our Ryobi One+ (18V) tools and cute little Milwaukee M12 (12V) tools, which we’ve started using for almost all of our work: they’re perfectly adequate for most “utility” drilling, lighter, and smaller than the Ryobis.

Why did we start messing with the Milwaukee M12 series? We specifically wanted something small, light, and versatile–and they had an M12-powered inspection scope. That started the buying spree, and now we’ve duplicated many of our Ryobis with the smaller M12 form factor, and couldn’t be happier. But we’ll keep using both.

Resources

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